Books I read, Uncategorized

Book I Read:The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

Description on Goodreads

Meet little Mole, willful Ratty, Badger the perennial bachelor, and petulant Toad. Over one hundred years since their first appearance in 1908, they’ve become emblematic archetypes of eccentricity, folly, and friendship. And their misadventures-in gypsy caravans, stolen sports cars, and their Wild Wood-continue to capture readers’ imaginations and warm their hearts long after they grow up. Begun as a series of letters from Kenneth Grahame to his son, The Wind in the Willows is a timeless tale of animal cunning and human camaraderie. This Penguin Classics edition features an appendix of the letters in which Grahame first related the exploits of Toad.

What says I

I love the classics. Through the years I focussed on reading the classics. And this beautiful classic also made it to our bookshelves. Mr Grahame created vivid and quirky characters in this story. And their adventures are as far fetched as you could possibly imagine, but we didn’t care. It is beautiful. It’s funny. It’s imaginative.

There is one thing I should probably point out, this is not a book to give your average young reader to wrestle through on his or her own. Mr Grahame used proper English with an elaborate vocabulary that is deemed formal in today’s terms. I read this to my early reader and my young reader. We had to stop frequently to recap the scene that the author just described. If you are a parent, please enjoy this book with your young ones. One day they will enjoy it themselves.

Other than the beautiful vocabulary that might be a challenge, I have absolutely no other complaints about this book.

What says others

I enjoyed the reviews on Goodreads. Quite varied. Letters Republic had more of a study written up. I thought Pink Floyd was an interesting twist in this classic saga! It has been turned into a musical which could be watched at the London Palladium in 2017! That I didn’t know. I would have loved to see it. Fantasy Book Review had a review but also a short write up of the author. It also reached no 38th on The Guardian’s 100 Best Novels. Gradesaver has a study guide available. Common sense Media has suggestions from parents that it is suitable for 9 year olds rather than 7. I have to agree. But that is where I prefer reading it out loud.

Where to connect with the author

Kennth Grahame died in 1932 but you can read up about him on Wikipedia, Biography and Britannica. Have a look at The Kenneth Grahame Society and what they do.

Where to buy this book

Find it on Takealot in South Africa and Amazon for elsewhere. It is also available in ebook format on Gutenberg

And that is it from me for now

Until next time sweet peeps!

Psst! This is my own book from my own library. I was not asked an opinion or for a review by anybody. This is all my own. Also none of the links in this post are affiliated. I benefit nothing from it, except for good books to be shared!

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