Wonderful Words

Words not often used 02:08

This week’s words were inspired from all sorts of articles I read in the newspaper, information leaflets etc. during our trip to London.

We were taught British English in school and to this day my vocabulary in every day use feels a bit more formal that what we read in books and hear in movies. Whenever my work gets edited or even reviewed, the reader always refer to my work being too formal or plain questions like ‘do people really speak this way?’ My answer to this is ‘yes, i do’.

But it was lovely reading these words in the everyday pieces I read.

I hope you enjoy this the way I did.

roisterer

– one who engages in merrymaking especially in honor of a special occasion (e.g. Dawn was breaking when the roisterers finally rolled back to Wallington’s apartments)

dissenters

– a person with a strong difference of opinion on a particular subject, especially about an official suggestion or plan or a popular belief; nonconformist (e.g. English dissenters played a pivotal role in spiritual development of the United States and greatly diversified the religious landscape)

disputations

– an academic exercise consisting of the arguing of a thesis between its maintainer and its opponents (e.g. we’ll have no politics and no religious disputations in this house)

penance

– an act that shows that you feel sorry about something that you have done, sometimes for religious reasons (e.g. the sinners paid penance for their sins in front of the congregations)

capacious

– having a lot of space and able to contain a lot; roomy (e.g. she has a capacious handbag)

quixotic

– an extremely unrealistic or impractical or idealistic idea, project or undertaking (e.g. the quixotic building project)

hawsers

– nautical term; a thick rope or cable used to tow or moor a ship (e.g. Abaca fiber is used in fishing nets, hawsers and shipping lines due to beneficial )

rapacious

– a strong wish to take or keep something for yourself, usually by unfair methods or force (e.g. she’s build her business with rapacious tenacity)

athwart

– from side to side; across; in opposition to; contradictory to (e.g. thus she was the first to notice the shadow fall athwart her desk)

portage

– the act of carrying; transport (e.g. we portaged our luggage across the airport via trolleys)

SOURCES

and growin…

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