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Words not used very often 01:05

I read daily with my kiddos and by myself. Maybe one day I can say the same about writing…We find many words not very common or familiar to us. Usually, I just grab the dictionary or add it to my personal register of words. (I am however trying to get rid of my paper notes) The WP app is always with me and it will take only a few seconds to type it up when I find it. Starting a while ago, I thought I’d build my record of words week by week here. Some more of our words that made me reach for the dictionary. Enjoy

vehemently

– in a strong and emotional way (e.g. She blushed and vehemently denied her attraction.)

infamy

– (formal noun) 1. the quality of being famous for something considered bad (e.g. Your infamous act of stealing food from children, is nothing to be proud of) 2. a bad and shocking act or event (e.g. The infamy of his adultery was the foundation of the stigma associated with the family.)

kilted

– (adjective) 1. wearing a kilt (e.g. The men were proudly kilted in their traditional dress during the parade.) 2. gathered in pleats, pleated (e.g. Part of the winning design was kilted in crisp pleats)

pannikin

– (noun) a small pan or metal cup (e.g. Grandma invested in a set of pannikin, especially for her grandchildren)

placate

– (verb) make (someone) less angry or hostile (e.g. Protesters will not be placated after the death of yet another youth)

traipsed

– (verb) to walk from one place to another, often feeling tired or bored (e.g. She traipsed through the library while her bookworm sister drooled over the biographies of people long dead)

beeline

– (noun) a straight line between two places (e.g. She made a beeline for the door)

detritus

– (noun) 1. (formal) waste material or rubbish, especially left after a particular event (e.g. Detritus littered the park after the New Years celebrations) 2. (specialised) (e.g. a loose mass of decaying material)

blunderbusses

– (noun) 1. an old-fashioned gun with a wide mouth that shoots a lot of small metal malls (e.g. The blunderbuss was a popular choice of weapon for both pirates and soldiers) 2. an action or way of doing something regarded as lacking in subtlety and precision (e.g. The old lady blunderbusses all young people based on her own prejudice)

forbearance

– (noun) the quality of being patient and being able to forgive someone or control yourself in a difficult situation (e.g. Amid the insults flung from the crowd, Humphrey showed forbearance above all other)

And that is it for my list of weird and wonderful words.

Please share some of your unique or seldom used words with me on Twitter.

Until next time!